Fujifilm backtracks on 800Z withdrawal

Due to demand from its customers, Fujifilm Professional has decided to continue production of Fujicolor Pro 800Z.  It was announced recently that the company was to discontinue the film from September 2009. Fujifilm’s UK Product Manager for Professional Film, Russ Gunn, explained the turnaround: “We were amazed by the reaction from our customers following the announcement that Fujifilm was going to discontinue Pro 800Z. We have received many calls and emails from photographers who appreciate the natural skin tones and fine grain that Pro 800Z gives them. Many people were genuinely upset about the withdrawal so we have bowed to this pressure and decided to continue production for the time being.”

Fujifilm discontinue press 800 colour neg stock

Fujifilm Professional is to discontinue one of its slower moving lines of film, from September 2009 production of Fujicolor Pro 800Z will cease. The company has a limited supply of the film in stock, enough to satisfy demand until approximatively November 2009.

Fujifilm’s Product Manager for Professional Film, Russ Gunn, explained the decision: “We have decided to remove all formats of Pro 800Z from our range due to low sales volume. By streamlining our selection of Professional film we can ensure our strong selling lines are protected.”

Gunn continued: “Sales of our colour negative and transparency films are doing very well and there has also been a recent upturn in sales of our instant films. We will continue to support photographers who appreciate the quality and flexibility of real film with a range of marketing activities including the Fujifilm Distinctions Awards, the Fujifilm Student Awards and our online resource for film users, Choose-film.com.”

For further details on the Fujifilm range of Professional film visit, www.fujifilm.co.uk/professional

Kodachrome reaches frame 39 – the end

LONDON UK, June 22, 2009 – Eastman Kodak Company announced today that it will retire KODACHROME colour film this year, concluding its 74-year run as a photography icon.

Sales of KODACHROME Film, which became the world’s first commercially successful colour film in 1935, have declined dramatically in recent years as photographers turned to other, newer KODAK films or to the digital imaging technologies that Kodak pioneered. Today, KODACHROME Film represents just a fraction of one percent of Kodak’s total sales of still-picture films.

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Nikon D5000 short film with pull focus

Though autofocus is not possible with live video in any current true DSLR (the Panasonic GH1 promises this) it is possible to use pull-focus effects with a little planning. We now have a Nikon D5000 – it won the competition for best fine image detail when comparing results frame by frame with Canon’s nominally higher resolution rival. It was also a very good deal, £629 inc VAT with an 18-55mm VR kit lens and a SanDisk Ultra II 8GB SDHC card plus Crumpler Messenger Boy 2500 bag thrown in free (from Jacobs). You Tube sample –

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Canon EOS 500D video test

The clip originally shown here has been replaced by an edited selection, shot in a mixture of 1080 and 720 modes, assembled using iMovie and written as a 720p final project for YouTube. Don’t mean to cause confusion, some visitors may have linked to this post already, and I do not want to add another post. Please feel free to link directly to the YouTube vid or to this page.

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Fuji launch developer for film's last days

Fujifilm has announced the UK release of a new chemistry, EnviroNeg Developer 60 AC, specifically designed for labs who have seen levels of film processing drop. Normal developers need a high enough throughput of films to remain correctly balanced, with replenishment, over cycles of days or weeks between cleanout and refill operations. The fewer films a lab gets, the worse their development quality control is likely to become.
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Kodak wedding camera for guests

Kodak is introducing a new Single Use Camera in a distinctive design especially for the wedding market. The KODAK Wedding Single Use Camera features elegant white roses on a silver body – a subtle, sophisticated design for any wedding. Combining style and quality, this latest addition to Kodak’s single use camera portfolio includes one of the best films available, Kodak’s 800–speed film, which provides unbeatable clarity and sharpness to produce the highest quality prints.

Single use cameras adorn wedding tables across Europe but many are low-cost products which match the decor but lead to disappointing prints,” said Oreste Maspes, Director of Kodak Film Group Europe. “Brides need products they can trust on their big day and, with the introduction of the KODAK Wedding Single Use Camera, brides and wedding planners need not choose between style and substance. The new designs are elegant and will look good on any table which means the happy couple can trust that Kodak has blended looks, convenience and the unbeatable quality of KODAK Film in one package.”

The new KODAK Wedding Single Use Camera is available for purchase in 10-pack increments exclusively online at http://www.kodak.com/go/SingleUseCamera through the Kodak Store. To mark the launch, Kodak is offering customers a saving of £40 on each 10 cameras pack (instead of £80, customers will only pay £40). The offer is available from June 12 until August 31, 2008.

In addition to the sophisticated new look, the camera boasts an easy-to-use design. Placed on tables at wedding receptions, guests of all ages can easily capture wonderfully informal shots that perfectly compliment the formal photographs of the day. Once printed, the newlyweds have a record of their special day through their loved ones’ eyes. Favourite candid images can be scanned and uploaded to a PC for inclusion in thank-you cards, photobooks and even canvases.

Up to 20% price hike for Fuji films and papers

FUJIFILM UK Ltd. (Managing Director Hiroshi Saigusa) has announced that it is to increase prices on its range of photographic papers and films in the United Kingdom. The price changes are being implemented on a worldwide basis.

Prices will be increased from July 2008 and will range between 10% and 20% depending on the product group.

To sustain its photo imaging business, FUJIFILM has been undertaking intensive structural reforms to reduce fixed costs and improve productivity, and has been absorbing the increasing costs of raw materials used to manufacture films and papers over the past few years. However, the recent soaring costs of such materials as silver and crude oil mean that FUJIFILM is no longer able to absorb these costs during the production process.

FUJIFILM’S photographic paper and film continues to set the standard in terms of image quality and they are appreciated by professionals and enthusiasts alike. Fujifilm remains fully committed to this important market and plans to continue its product development of new photosensitive material.